More Moms are Working the Night Shift

April 19, 2011 – 7:15 pm

As Work-at-home moms, we are constantly redefining what it means to be a working parent.  I can get a full 9-hour day in and still spend the majority of it shuttling the kids to story time and making peanut butter sandwiches.  According to a recent article on the NY Times blog, I’m not alone.  Jamie Rich, a London-based journalist, writes about a new subculture of mothers – women who work the night shift.

A growing number of women in a variety of different professions – from freelance photographers to journalists to enterpreneurs – start their work day after they put their kids to bed.  One of the advantages of working the night shift is having the day to focus on your family.  Monica Branchmoore owns her own photography business.  She puts her kids to bed at 9 p.m. and the works until 2:15 a.m.  Monica, like many women in her position, wants to spend time with her family but feels the need to work.  Even stay-at-home moms are losing sleep to catch up on organizing their schedules and responding to their emails.

Working the night shift has its drawbacks.  It can put a strain on your relationship.  According to one expert, “the likelihood of marital discord increases for families when one parent works at night.”  However, making the most of the “adult moments” can strengthen your marital bond and make you happier people and parents.  Rich writes, “the fulfillment of staying engaged in my profession and the personal richness of being available for our daughter makes up for the few hours of awake-time that I miss each week with my family.”

To find out more about mothers working the graveyard shift, click here.



About Andrea Hart
Andrea Hart is a freelance writer, a student, a teacher, a wife and a mother to two rambunctious boys. She currently resides in Southeastern PA.
  1. 8 Responses to “More Moms are Working the Night Shift”

  2. I had such a guilt feeling all the time since i work the Graveyard shift…It feels great to find soul sisters around the world..Sisters WE ARE THE NEW MOMS..The evolved ones.

    By Tania on Apr 20, 2011

  3. Thank you for this…I work, it feels like, day and night – I used to work at home (for about five years when my daughter was 1 to 5) and earlier in my life as a single mom. Now I work during the day at a day job and go home to be “mommy” (which I cherish) and then spend the evenings working some more on a home business so I can try to create some savings for myself. I’ve recently started a blog on trying to find out ways to build our life so we can be mothers and actually have time for our families and husbands (http://sicofbeingpo.blogspot.com/)…and save towards our retirement and vacations and other things that don’t involve working working working – come visit, talk, and share some ideas…we need it…

    By Jora Trang on Apr 21, 2011

  4. Thanks for the great article, the business I work with, anyone can do it & people of all ages.

    By Adam on Apr 22, 2011

  5. I have found myself working the night shift(10pm to 6am). I do so that I have the time to spend with the family. However, my sleeping has almost completely stopped. I must learn to manage my time better.

    By Missy H. on May 30, 2011

  6. This is almost a year old, but I felt the need to comment…I recently started working night shift at a nursing home and I think it is the best of both worlds. There were several things that made me decide it was the right choice:
    1) Even with me working, there isn’t alot of money left over for daycare if I chose to work during the day.
    2) Being home with my daughter during the day is important to me.
    3) I am a night owl, and even before I went back to work, I would often stay up late into the night, unable to fall asleep. By working third shift, I am able to take advantage of my increased energy at night.

    We have family close by, and my hubby generally gets off between 3 and 6, so I get to sleep for at least 4 hours a day before my shifts at 11 pm. It’s not much, but what I lose in quantity, I make up for in quality. No longer do I toss and turn, or lie awake for hours trying to fall asleep. I’m out when my head hits the pillow and I don’t wake up again til my alarm goes off. Plus I make up my sleep on nights when I don’t have to work by going to bed when my LO does, so I can get a good 10 hours.

    As far as marriage suffering, I’ve always believed absence makes the heart grow fonder, and it seems me and my hubby get along better now in the more limited time we have together.

    Most importantly, though, when I’m at work, I don’t feel like I am missing out on my daughter. I can be at ease knowing she is safe asleep at home, not in the arms of a day-care center, or missing me because I’m not around. What I am missing out on is sleep, and that’s much more acceptable to me than missing my daughter.

    By Stephanonymous on Feb 15, 2012

  7. Since I am a single parent raising my kids alone, I just wanted to add my 2 cents…. there are many work-at-home dads who use this site and I just wanted to say thank you and keep it coming. I know this is WorkAtHomeMom site, but I can’t live without it!

    By Roy on Feb 20, 2012

  8. This is for Roy, glad to see other “Dads” here at the “Mom”site! Glad I am not alone.

    By Kyle on Feb 27, 2012

  9. My youngest of 5 just went to school. I like to be involved with school activities and evening homework as well as good old quality time. Does anyone have a list of stay at home night shift jobs. My journey is just beginning. My field is Customer Service.

    Thanks!

    By Telecia on Sep 6, 2012

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